Guillermo Del Toro: Falling in Love with Monsters

Del Toro has induced young creatives like me with films that have continuously elicited the land of dreams that kept him awake as a young boy. From his 1993 mythological and religiously infused work Cronos; to his adaptation of the Dark Horse Comics’ anti-hero Hellboy; to his Oscar-nominated and disobedient fairy tale Pan’s Labyrinth; to his 2017 success found in the tender and lyrical romance The Shape of Water (also … Continue reading Guillermo Del Toro: Falling in Love with Monsters

‘Raise Hell: The Life and Times of Molly Ivins’ is an Enjoyable and Engaging Journey

Documentaries can introduce us to a person we’ve never heard of and leave us baffled as to how long we’ve gone without them in our lives. Raise Hell: The Life and Times of Molly Ivins is one of such films. Continue reading ‘Raise Hell: The Life and Times of Molly Ivins’ is an Enjoyable and Engaging Journey

‘The Mandalorian’ S2E6 Review: NO!

[Editors note: this review contains spoilers for The Mandalorian] As soon as the episode title was revealed to be ‘The Tragedy’ I knew we were in trouble. It’s a sign of how invested I am in the show that I can get emotionally unsettled by a mere title drop, but here we are. New Star Wars content began to roll out again when I was … Continue reading ‘The Mandalorian’ S2E6 Review: NO!

‘Black Bear’ May Stand as the Most Ambitious Film of the Year

We start this off with an image that we will come back to a few times. It is of Allison (Aubrey Plaza) in a one piece, red bathing suit. She gets up and walks into the cabin behind her, going up to a room where she has a journal on the table. The movie is then told in two different chapters. The first one is … Continue reading ‘Black Bear’ May Stand as the Most Ambitious Film of the Year

‘Mank’: The Black Magic of the Movies

David Fincher is probably one of Hollywood’s finest misanthropes. From Fight Club to The Social Network, his cinematic offerings are full of moody settings and contemptuous characters often sucked in and spat out by a world that revels in their suffering. Any attempts to chance their hell of a world for the better often end up dooming it. So how to explain Mank? Fincher’s 11th … Continue reading ‘Mank’: The Black Magic of the Movies

Body Horror and the Jackass Films

Early on in Jackass: The Movie, cast members Johnny Knoxville, Chris Pontius, Dave England, and Ehren McGhehey sit around a table with a muscle stimulator (a device that sends an electric current through the muscles of whatever part of the body it is hooked up to). Knoxville starts with the stimulator pads on his cheeks. The switch is thrown and he screams in pain before … Continue reading Body Horror and the Jackass Films

‘Minari’ is a Singular Joy

For director Lee Isaac Chung, creating Minari was a process of excavation. It opens and closes with memories from Chung’s childhood: beginning with the family’s first sight of their new home in Arkansas and ending with the grandmother’s minari patch, thriving on the outskirts of their property. This oenanthe javanica plant, the film’s namesake and a herb that can grow just about anywhere according to … Continue reading ‘Minari’ is a Singular Joy

‘A Matter of Life and Death’, in celebration of the birth of Emeric Pressburger

If we ever required proof positive that immigrants and refugees bring creative and cultural diversity to our shores, we need look no further than Emeric Pressburger. Escaping the Nazis in the 1930s, he moved to Paris before settling in London. Here, fellow Hungarian and movie mogul, Alexander Korda, puts him to work with director Michael Powell, script editing ‘The Spy in Black’ (1939). Powell and Pressburger … Continue reading ‘A Matter of Life and Death’, in celebration of the birth of Emeric Pressburger

‘Never Rarely Sometimes Always’ Star Sidney Flanigan: “I Won’t Live in a World Where You Can’t Get an Abortion”

In January and February this year, despite glimmers of the coronavirus that would completely derail the industry and the world, the Sundance and Berlin film festivals managed to go on mostly unscathed. Featuring at both of those events was Eliza Hittman’s Never Rarely Sometimes Always, a quiet, understated drama about Autumn, a young woman who travels to New York with her cousin Skyler to get … Continue reading ‘Never Rarely Sometimes Always’ Star Sidney Flanigan: “I Won’t Live in a World Where You Can’t Get an Abortion”

‘The Mandalorian’ S2 E5 Review: YEEEEESSSSS!!!!

[Editors note: this review contains spoilers for The Mandalorian] I’ll get this out of the way now – I’m not calling him ‘Grogu.’ The Slice’s official position on the title of Baby Yoda will forever remain ‘Baby Yoda.’ Until the name grows on me. Which probably won’t be long. But I feel like this is a classic example of a show taking an action that … Continue reading ‘The Mandalorian’ S2 E5 Review: YEEEEESSSSS!!!!

‘Cordelia’ is a Thriller with a Missing Puzzle Piece

The psychological thriller Cordelia recently gained some traction when it sparked a massive, far-reaching horny uproar on Twitter over its promotional poster, which features Johnny Flynn, who plays Frank, and Antonia Campbell-Hughes as the lead Cordelia, in a roles-reversed pose, with Campbell-Hughes pinning Flynn against a wall. Needless to say, it was pretty effective marketing.  The movie itself, which is directed by Adrian Shergold, follows … Continue reading ‘Cordelia’ is a Thriller with a Missing Puzzle Piece

The Juice #3 – Institutionally Absurd

Welcome to The Juice, a monthly column at The Slice where we present to you a curated programme of films to tune into each month! This month our programme is Institutionally Absurd! This edition of The Juice has been put together by Joel Whitaker and Andrea Cordoba Institutions are a bit like the monolith in 2001. They’re big, ominous, and can have worldchanging effects. They … Continue reading The Juice #3 – Institutionally Absurd